Episode 54 – The Fellowship of Swift

This week we follow up on the Swift adoption discussion started last week. We discuss the “All you eat” software models. We discuss the role of Product Manager in development. Tim Cook sends an email and saves stock market. Picks Crossy Road (Pacman edition), PAC-MAN 256 and iSwift.

NB The 360|iDev 2015 videos should be ready around Sept 4, 2015

Episode 54 Show Notes:

Episode 55 Picks:

Episode 21 – Swift, Ready or Not Here it Comes

Feed updated

This week we discuss the use of Swift in production apps. We each relate our experiences with the interactive and often difficulties working with Xcode and Swift 1.1. We also discuss the reaction to a post by Marco Arment that sparked many developers into voicing an opinion. We discuss our picks; Smash Hit, Piskell, AV Audio Engine and Printrbot Simple Metal 3D printer. During and after the show we briefly discuss Magicavoxel, Aaron’s prowess at Crossy Road, Dash and app pricing.

Restart USBmux Daemon in Terminal
on the command line enter:
sudo launchctl stop com.apple.usbmuxd

Thanks to Fahim Farook (mentioned as the dev from Malaysia)

Pure Swift Apps on the App Store:

WriteTrack – Submission Tracking for Writers
WriteOn
WriteOn Lite
Instant Poetry 2

Episode 21 Notes:

Swift 1.1
Devices not connecting in Xcode
Apple Has Lost the Functional High Ground
Release Notes Podcast
Fast Fourier Transform
Dash API Docs
RayWenderlich.com

Episode 21 Picks:

Smash Hit
Piske

MagicaVoxel
AVAudioEngine
WWDC 2014 Videos
Printrbot
Riverdale3D

Book Review – Objective-C Programming: the Big Nerd Ranch Guide, 2nd Edition

obj-c-cover

I recently conducted an online class on Objective-C Programming. Part of the gig involved creating a course and choosing a book to assign to the students. The book would ideally provide a comprehensive overview of Objective-C as well as provide exercises for the students to work on each new aspect. After reviewing several texts, I chose Objective-C Programming: the Big Nerd Ranch Guide, 2nd Edition, by Aaron Hillegass and Mikey Ward and it proved to be an ideal resource for introducing Objective-C.

In this day and age, you would think that new users should be leaning Apple’s Swift language. You would be partially correct. However many seasoned developers have found that swift is an evolving language and frequent changes have made full time adoption challenging. I have always believed that learning the basics and roots of a language or any new skill is very important to great learning. Objective-C Programming – the Big Nerd Ranch Guide does indeed cover the basics, in fact starts even deeper, with several exercises on the C language. Objective-C is not simply based in C, it is actually a superset of C – as the text points out. Building a solid understanding of C leads the students progressively into Object Oriented Programming.

Like all of the Big Nerd Ranch guides, this book develops the users skills gradually. Midway through the book, you are rocking through ever advancing Objective-C concepts. By the end of the text, users have been introduced to Protocols, Class Extensions, ARC and Blocks. The book uses a practical mix of building skills and knowledge and is a great introduction to Objective-C. It lays a great foundation that could easily be followed up by the iOS Programming: Big Nerd Ranch Guide (5th edition pending) and hopefully a forthcomming BNR guide to Swift.

Hire Tim

Tim Mitra avatar

A few people have asked about hiring me on contract. So I put together this post:

I am and independent developer and designer working in iOS and web technologies. I have been involved in many app deployments on the AppStore, as the main idea guy or architect of apps; doing client work and some personal apps. Collectively we had over 500K downloads over the last 5 years, which I think it’s better than most. My background is in the graphic arts, print and publishing, and the IT work involved in those trades. However I have always made stuff and consider myself a solutions provider – my unique ability.

While I do wrangle developers, writers and artists, I spend the majority of my time actually writing code and assembling the apps. I am also the person who deals with the actual submission to the AppStore. So I can start an app from pen and paper sketches all the way to the App Store and analytics. While doing so I make stops to assemble copy, create graphics & UX, write the code, assemble the apps, localization, distribute the builds, wrangle git & branches, write server APIs, product management, as well as marketing and promotions. Soup to nuts as any indie IOS developer should be (and hiring out help on big projects).

I am located in Toronto Canada, where I try to run a small development company. I teach introductory courses on iOS development. I write for raywenderlich.com and I founded and host the More Than Just Code podcast.

Tim

resume and references available on request.