Episode 225 – A BIt Of A Fumble

We get an iOS shortcut for bypassing paywalls in #askMTJC. We follow up with a deep dive into poor iPhone XR adoption figures, Google+ has potentially exposed data from 52M users, Infinity Blade games removed from the App Store, Apple appeals to China’s iPhone ban, and Samsung removes the headphone jack. We take a look at some Swift tricks that you may not know about. Swift 5.0 wants us to try some nice breaking changes. You can record ARKit sessions in order to debug. It’s apparently really easy to add a second display to an iOS app. Picks: A look at the Original 1984 Macintosh User Manual, Swift Docker image hosted by Apple.

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Episode 220 – It’s Better Than AR

Greg Heo joins Tim for discussions on the new MacBook Air, iPad Pro and iPhone XR. Apple’s Recycling on the new MacBook Air is not all that! In App Pricing disappeared from the App Store. Greg visited the Samsung Developer Conference 2018 in search of the folding phone. We discussed the iOS Developer Roadmap. Helium can brick your iPhone. Apple reduces the production line for the iPhone XR. Stockholm nixes Apple Store plans in the Kungsträdgården. Bad algorithms are making inappropriate decisions. Picks: iPad Pro (2018) Review, Teach Yourself Computer Science

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Episode 208 – The Bio Sensor

This week we discuss RSUs vs stock options as well as why developers become frustrated. Google tracking continues even after users turn off location tracking. We discuss deploying new MacBook Pros in the enterprise and a hack uncovered that exploits a DEP mac before a user first logs in. Pick: Ongoing History Of New Music Podcast

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Ongoing History of New Music by Curiouscast on Apple Podcasts

Episode 199 – Your WWDC 2018 E Ticket

We follow up with Mark about his experiences at WWDC 2018 and we discuss some of our favorite sessions. Mark gives shout outs to Victoria Heric, Ed Arenberg, David Sinclair and Dann Beauregard. We follow up on Apple banning apps that sell user’s contact info. Audrey Tam has published a tutorial on Create ML. Apple is also banning apps that do cryptocurrency mining. We discuss a Swift for Android solution. Tim installs macOS Mojave to tryout Dark Mode. We discuss a video on 50 + macOS Mohave changes. We look at Marzipan in Mojave. Mark regales us with week at WWDC 2018. We both discuss our favorite WWDC sessions. Picks: What’s new in Swift 4.2, Pixelmator for iOS, Server Side Swift with Kitura tutorial.

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Episode 160 – Not Dongle

We follow up on the Red Socks allegedly stealing signs utilizing Apple Watch. We also look at the MacBook Pro 13 via Joe Cieplinski as well as governments stockpiling security exploits. Recorded on September 6, 2017, we discuss the Apple Developer site suddenly going into maintenance mode. We discuss a searching for object types in Swift and a lazy solution to dealing with delegates. Picks: Sound Kit for Prototypes, iOS Programming: The Big Nerd Ranch Guide (6th Edition)

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Episode 104 – Mix Another Metaphor

We start off the askMTJC with discussion of resources for budding developers. We discuss iMore’s transition away from Apple News to focus on tech and how to’s. We follow up on Protocols with Associated Types and Protocol Oriented programming in Swift. A few exploits are discussed around of the leak of Microsoft’s “Golden Key”. We discuss the importance of a work life balance. Picks: Fira Code, Pocket Casts 6, Apple’s Olympic Watch Bands

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* Correction: Pocket Casts is from the team at Shifty Jelly, not Daniel “Jelly” Farrelly of Mobile Couch fame. MTJC thanks listener Josh Adams for setting us straight.

Episode 95 – Batman & Rubin

This week we follow up on Apple Pay. Our #askMTJC spawns questions about getting a start in freelance, bootcamps for Android, expectations of Xcode 8 and does host Mark Rubin have a personal Twitter account. We dive in and discuss Apple’s newly announced App Subscriptions, Shortened Review Times and Paid App Search Ads. Jaime introduced WWDC Friends. We also discuss our WWDC wish list. Picks: Motion Stills by Google, Android iPhone Case, Oslo Coding, Creating and Distributing iOS Frameworks

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Episode 92 – The MTJC Book Club

This week we are joined by Greg Heo to get caught up on his move to San Francisco. We discuss  the 12 inch MacBook. We discuss a couple of #askMTJC questions on books and resources for iOS developers as well as finding inspiration and blockers. We follow up on Perfectsoft, Swift 3.0 and the lack of ABI compatibility, MacID, a Women in Code study and Shorter App review times. Picks: Gboard, Finda.photo, Pallets, Disrupted and Swift Algorithm Club.

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Episode 68 – The Future of Swift Idioms

idiomatic swift

We dive right in on a discussion on wages and salaries for iOS developers. Next we celebrate Adobe’s decision to end Flash and introduce Animate CC. We discuss Dan Frommer’s post on the stalled Apple Watch platform. Bohemian Coding’s decision to remove Sketch from the Mac App Store is also discussed. We corner guest host Greg Heo on whether Swift has gained it’s own development idioms and the pending Swift going open source. Picks: Realm, Asynchronous Values in Swift, UITouch.StylusApple Campus WIP

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Book Review – Objective-C Programming: the Big Nerd Ranch Guide, 2nd Edition

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I recently conducted an online class on Objective-C Programming. Part of the gig involved creating a course and choosing a book to assign to the students. The book would ideally provide a comprehensive overview of Objective-C as well as provide exercises for the students to work on each new aspect. After reviewing several texts, I chose Objective-C Programming: the Big Nerd Ranch Guide, 2nd Edition, by Aaron Hillegass and Mikey Ward and it proved to be an ideal resource for introducing Objective-C.

In this day and age, you would think that new users should be leaning Apple’s Swift language. You would be partially correct. However many seasoned developers have found that swift is an evolving language and frequent changes have made full time adoption challenging. I have always believed that learning the basics and roots of a language or any new skill is very important to great learning. Objective-C Programming – the Big Nerd Ranch Guide does indeed cover the basics, in fact starts even deeper, with several exercises on the C language. Objective-C is not simply based in C, it is actually a superset of C – as the text points out. Building a solid understanding of C leads the students progressively into Object Oriented Programming.

Like all of the Big Nerd Ranch guides, this book develops the users skills gradually. Midway through the book, you are rocking through ever advancing Objective-C concepts. By the end of the text, users have been introduced to Protocols, Class Extensions, ARC and Blocks. The book uses a practical mix of building skills and knowledge and is a great introduction to Objective-C. It lays a great foundation that could easily be followed up by the iOS Programming: Big Nerd Ranch Guide (5th edition pending) and hopefully a forthcomming BNR guide to Swift.