Episode 21 – Swift, Ready or Not Here it Comes

Feed updated

This week we discuss the use of Swift in production apps. We each relate our experiences with the interactive and often difficulties working with Xcode and Swift 1.1. We also discuss the reaction to a post by Marco Arment that sparked many developers into voicing an opinion. We discuss our picks; Smash Hit, Piskell, AV Audio Engine and Printrbot Simple Metal 3D printer. During and after the show we briefly discuss Magicavoxel, Aaron’s prowess at Crossy Road, Dash and app pricing.

Restart USBmux Daemon in Terminal
on the command line enter:
sudo launchctl stop com.apple.usbmuxd

Thanks to Fahim Farook (mentioned as the dev from Malaysia)

Pure Swift Apps on the App Store:

WriteTrack – Submission Tracking for Writers
WriteOn
WriteOn Lite
Instant Poetry 2

Episode 21 Notes:

Swift 1.1
Devices not connecting in Xcode
Apple Has Lost the Functional High Ground
Release Notes Podcast
Fast Fourier Transform
Dash API Docs
RayWenderlich.com

Episode 21 Picks:

Smash Hit
Piske

MagicaVoxel
AVAudioEngine
WWDC 2014 Videos
Printrbot
Riverdale3D

Episode 19 – Inside Moneyball and steak dinners

This we we discuss more post-review rejections on the App Store, IBM and Apple announce apps for the Enterprise and Rob Rhynes’ article on professional app pricing. This weeks picks; Golfinity & Desert Golf, MMWormhole, Clockwork Brain and The Glass Age.

Episode 18 – Crossover Episode with developer/podcaster Tammy Coron

This week Tim has an impromptu conversation with Tammy Coron, a multidiscipline creative professional. She’s a artist, musician, writer, developer and host of the RoundaboutFM podcast. We discuss podcasting, comparing MTJC and Roundabout approach, how she chose to live in Tennessee, The Walking Dead & zombies. We talk about her history as an artists and developer, work with raywenderlich.com and how she hangs onto her power while covered in muck.

** Spoiler -The Walking Dead: Midseason Finale  skip 12:26 to 14:00 **

shameless

Episode 18 Notes:
RoundaboutFM
Easy Listening – Marco Arment
SpringBoardShow (episode with Tim Mitra)
SpringBoardShow (episode with Aaron Vegh)
RayWenderlich.com
RoundaboutFM (episode with Tammy’s Mom *Must Listen*)
How to Start a Podcast: 5 Top Tools – Tammy Coron
Teaching kids to program with wooden blocks
Strategic Coach
Y2K Bug
SNL: Your Company’s Computer Guy
Tim_Burton
Do not update: iOS 8.0.1 cripples iPhone 6 and 6 Plus by killing Touch ID and cell service
How To Import and Export App Data Via Email in your iOS App
Tammy on RayWenderlich.com
Slack
Shameless Marketing for Brazen Hussies: 307 Awesome Money-Making Strategies for Savvy Entrepreneurs
The Business of Art – Lee Caplin
ReleaseNotes Podcast
LUA Programming Language
Twilight Zone – Time Enough At Last

Episode 18 Picks:
Float Label Fields – Fahim Farook

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Episode 16 – That Time When Art & Technology Met

This week we discuss the arrival of Apple’s WatchKit addition to iOS SDK. We follow up on the relevance of Technical Job interviews and also on GT Advanced Technologies vs Apple. Aaron’s pick is Atlantic.net and Jaime has another proud papa moment discussing the Target In Store app by his former employer, Point Inside. Tim’s pick on the additional levels added to the award winning Monument Valley app, evolves into a discussion about buyer’s perception of value and the challenges developers & publishers face.

Episode 16 Show Notes
Technical Interviews are Bullshit – Anonymous, Model View Culture
The Desperate Struggle at the Heart of the Apple Supply Chain – Charles Arthur,  the Guardian
WatchKit – Apple
11 things we just learned about how the Apple Watch works – the Verge
Target adds in-store spin to iPhone app by adding interactive maps for all 1,800 U.S. stores – Tricia Duryee, GeekWire
Review: Monument Valley’s Forgotten Shores expansion is a triumph – Serenity Caldwell, iMore
Monument Valley Teaser Trailer – UsTwoSoftware
ustwo at Nordic Game 2014: Making of Monument Valley in Unity

Episode 16 Picks
Cloud VPS Hosting @ $0.99/month
Target In Store App powered by Point Inside
Monument Valley

Outtakes – Show Music
Space Jazz – Dmitry Rodionov, Melody Loops
iPhone (MetroGnome Remix) – Aaron’s suggestion

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Book Review – Objective-C Programming: the Big Nerd Ranch Guide, 2nd Edition

obj-c-cover

I recently conducted an online class on Objective-C Programming. Part of the gig involved creating a course and choosing a book to assign to the students. The book would ideally provide a comprehensive overview of Objective-C as well as provide exercises for the students to work on each new aspect. After reviewing several texts, I chose Objective-C Programming: the Big Nerd Ranch Guide, 2nd Edition, by Aaron Hillegass and Mikey Ward and it proved to be an ideal resource for introducing Objective-C.

In this day and age, you would think that new users should be leaning Apple’s Swift language. You would be partially correct. However many seasoned developers have found that swift is an evolving language and frequent changes have made full time adoption challenging. I have always believed that learning the basics and roots of a language or any new skill is very important to great learning. Objective-C Programming – the Big Nerd Ranch Guide does indeed cover the basics, in fact starts even deeper, with several exercises on the C language. Objective-C is not simply based in C, it is actually a superset of C – as the text points out. Building a solid understanding of C leads the students progressively into Object Oriented Programming.

Like all of the Big Nerd Ranch guides, this book develops the users skills gradually. Midway through the book, you are rocking through ever advancing Objective-C concepts. By the end of the text, users have been introduced to Protocols, Class Extensions, ARC and Blocks. The book uses a practical mix of building skills and knowledge and is a great introduction to Objective-C. It lays a great foundation that could easily be followed up by the iOS Programming: Big Nerd Ranch Guide (5th edition pending) and hopefully a forthcomming BNR guide to Swift.

My 10-Star Review of Monument Valley

IMG_5266Seriously? People are giving Monument Valley one-star reviews because they are charging $2 (TWO dollars) for adding new levels?

Ok. So I’ve calmed down (a bit.) Let me start by saying that I first downloaded Monument Valley after it won an Apple Design Award at WWDC 2014. I had heard about it and it was featured on the App Store for weeks before (Zzzz!) However once I downloaded the app, I have to admit I was astounded. It will literally and figuratively change your perspective on how games should be created (pun intended.) Play the game or watch the 30 second video preview on the App Store.

It is a beautiful well thought out set of mysteries. You guide the little mistress heroin, Ida, of the game through as series of puzzles while soothing music plays in the background. There are no instructions needed and you simply tap the screen to navigate through the levels. There are only 10 levels in the original game, but it is full of “surprise and delight” – which Apple loves to see.

Most developers, heck, most artists only dream of creating such a wonderful work as this? Pull your head out of your a$$. Software costs money to develop, so you should be glad that you only have to pay less that a Starbucks latte! The one-star reviews merely serve to point out what is wrong with Apple’s insistence on a rating system. The App Store is broken as many app developers will tell you. The marketing bullies with deep pockets and have taken over. There is no App Store for the rest of us and that’s a shame. You can join the discussion on the More Than Just Code podcast. We’ve covered this issue for months. I’m sure this will be in the discussions in next weeks episode.

Hand your iPad to an 8 year old kid and watch the magic happen! “You non-contibuting zero” – Louis CK.

This is my review. If only I could give these guys a 10 star review!

monument-Review

 

Download the app here.

Episode 12 – MAS Exodus in the Air 2

This week we discuss the challenges of publishing OS X apps on the Mac App Store. We also discuss the challenge of publishing apps specifically for the iPad, in light of the stellar reviews of the iPad Air 2. Our weekly picks include Apple Pay, adding directions with the MapKit API, Battery Doctor and the upcoming RWDevCon. Listen the podcast for a discount code.

Episode 12 Show Notes:

Mac App Store: The subtle Exodus
Bare Bones: BBEdit 11
Panic: Coda 2
Release Notes – #75 Figure out what that iPad is… then tell us.
Apple’s AtEase
Apple iPad Air 2 review – Magical, not revolutionary
Korg: IMS-20 for iPad
Korg Gadget
MetaKite: Benjamin Task Manager for iPhone
MetaKite: Benjamin Task Manager for the iPad

Pick of the Week:

Apple Pay
Adding directions in MapKit API
Battery Doctor
RWDevCon 2015 – February 6th–7th, 2015 The Liaison Capitol Hill Hotel, Washington DC
Tell ‘em MTJC sent you.

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Xcode 6 FirstResponder Picker Conundrum

So I’m working away on a simple app, that has data presented in tableViews. By default tableViews use UILabels to display the data. To make them editable, requires adding a custom tableViewCell class and putting UITextFields in place. Simple enough.

What if the data to be input is a date or a choice of one, two or three values? Well then you add a UIDatePickerView or a UIPickerView when the user taps on the field. But wait! This is Xcode 6’s Simulator you’re running on. Why not mess with the developer a bit – that should be fun. When the date textField is tapped do nothing. Let’s see how many Google searches or twitter posts are required to solve this?

iOS Simulator Screen Shot Oct 14, 2014, 7.34.49 PM

 

Wait! What!? Tapping the date field doesn’t open the Date Picker?

“Well, let’s take a look at the simulator’s Keyboard setting,” says the wizen senior developer. Sure enough under the Hardware menu, is a Keyboard, with a submenu checked that says, “Connect Hardware Keyboard.” Uncheck that, and as if by magic, the Date Picker appears. There is much rejoicing throughout the land.

Picker View appears when "Connect Hardware Keyboard" is unchecked
Picker View appears when “Connect Hardware Keyboard” is unchecked

The example app is form “More iOS 6 Development” published by Apress.

Episode #10 – I am the one who knocks. I am Yosemite – Oct 8, 2014

This week we ponder the significance of Apple’s upcoming October 16th press conference, It’s been far too long. Will there be a new iPad, or Mac’s. What mountains will Apple climb next. We also take an overdue look at Estimote’s iBeacon implementation. We discuss the trilateralization of electrons and their effect on the disappearance of StarTrek hardware.

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Detect iOS 8 with Xcode 5.1.1

While prepping an app for submission that still supports iOS 6 & 7, we discovered a bug when the app in run under iOS 8. There was a change to EKEventViewController that leaves behind some UI when the view is dismissed. So we had to use the default method for presenting the view.

The way we tested for iOS 6 and 7 last year was to check the version with:

floor(NSFoundationVersionNumber) <= NSFoundationVersionNumber_iOS_6_1)

However Xcode 5.1.1 doesn’t have an enum higher than NSFoundationVersionNumber_iOS_6_1, so it won’t detect an OS version higher than 6.1.

NB the recommended solution is to build your app with Xcode 6, which does recognize NSFoundationVersionNumber_iOS_7_1.

To detect the system version you can use “systemVersion” from “UIDevice”. It’s not decremented yet, so you can do something like:

NSLog(@”system %i”, [UIDevice currentDevice].systemVersion.intValue);

        NSString *version = [UIDevice currentDevice].systemVersion;

        if (version.intValue <= 7.1) {

            // Do something for iOS 7.1 or earlier

        } else {

            // Do something for iOS 8.0 or later

        }

This hasn’t been tested much, but give it a try.

The next release will be on Xcode 6 (I promise!)